Monday, September 22, 2014

A Montana Adventure

We woke up this morning to 35 degree temps, the smell of bacon, and wood smoke. It might as well be October in northwest Montana. I love it here at my parents house. They live 40 miles from town between Libby and Troy, Montana at the base of Snowshoe and Ibex Peak...it is heaven on earth. I don't know that I've been to a more beautiful place!






Tanner, Beckett, and I left to go hiking in search of the perfect piece of driftwood for my herb drying rack that will hang above our kitchen table. The driftwood will hang from two oxidized copper pipes. We're distressing them ourselves using hard boiled eggs. Tutorial coming soon! 



The foliage here is AMAZING. There are so many different types of plants and so much moisture that EVERYTHING is green. It smells like dirt and rain even with the sun out. 



  We hiked along the bank of the Bull River and I found the perfect piece of driftwood right away. We decided to keep going though...the mystery of what's around the corner is just too enticing! 




We stopped at an old forest service cabin that had been torn down, only leaving the foundation and a bench by the water. We sat and talked about how we'd love to move back to Montana...oh how I hope it happens SOON! The air is crisp and refreshing. My mom says you could bottle and sell it...I think she's right.



It was an incredible day full of nature and coversation and family bonding. Montana is magical. Have you ever visited Montana?? Have a blog post about Montana? Post it in the comments!! 







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7 comments:

  1. You sure are making me miss Montana! Someday we will live there

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  2. My husband vacationed in Montana right before we met and he keeps telling me that we MUST go there together. I have to agree, although I KNOW I would never return home to Texas (where it is still in the 90s in mid-September. :(
    Oh, and distressing with hard-boiled eggs? Can't wait to hear about that one!

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  3. My mom lives in Montana and we've spent a couple of weeks there over the past few years. I don't know which I loved more: staying by the Gallatin River, or in town where I could walk to local shops and restaurants.

    http://casacaudill.blogspot.com/2011/10/visiting-montana.html

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  4. I just found your blog and I am just loving it! What a cute little guy you have! I love country life as well as the mountains. We are taking off to our home away from home in the mountains of North Carolina on Saturday! Yay!

    I've never been to Montana. My daughter's bestie moved there several years ago and the beauty of it changed her heart and soul. She now lives near Seattle. I don't think she will ever come back to the Midwest.

    I'll be back! :)

    Jane xx

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  5. This prompted me to peruse about half of The Drowning Pool – 133 pages or so – to see how many similes I could count. (I’m using the Vintage Crime Black Lizard edition from May 1996). I counted thirty four and no doubt missed a few. I haven’t done the legwork, but I think some of the later books might have a slightly higher ratio. That’s a lot, but in any case I would argue that many of Macdonald’s similes are so strong that they infinitely enrich the work. Not only that – they are so strong that they put many “serious” writers of fiction to shame.
    http://postmoderndeconstructionmadhouse.blogspot.com/2014/11/ross-macdonald-drowning-pool.html#.VHQTZtKUeRZ

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  6. An alcoholic in the hobo jungle: “He came up close to me so that I could smell his firey breath and look deep into the glaring hollows of his eyes. They had a feverish brainwashed wino emptiness. He was so far gone that he would never come back."
    http://postmoderndeconstructionmadhouse.blogspot.com/2014/12/ross-macdonald-black-money.html#.VIJIcdLF_xA

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  7. Here’s a situation that arises continually in the Lew Archer novels: someone Archer is investigating is surprised to learn how much he knows about them. In Black Money Kitty Hendricks voices this surprise in virtually those very words –“How do you know so much about me?” Usually, though, the knowledge Archer has obtained when this question comes up turns out to be peripheral – that is, it doesn’t bear directly on the solution to the case but is just a part of the hopelessly tangled morass of action and information Archer is working his way through. In the novels that most critics and scholars seem to feel comprise the mature Macdonald style – The Galton Case through The Blue Hammer – the reader is constantly being thrown off the scent this way.
    http://postmoderndeconstructionmadhouse.blogspot.com/2014/12/ross-macdonald-black-money.html

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